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Inanna's descent into the underworld

sinbad

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Dec 12, 2023
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In the story, when Inanna reaches the gatekeeper of the underworld, she is told at each of the 7 gates [chakras] to remove an article of clothing and that this serves to "strip her of her power" until she finally arrives at the end totally naked.

I imagine this has more to do with "purification" of the chakras, but she seems somehow humiliated/weakened by the whole ordeal. And is trapped, waiting to be saved by Enki.

Is this just for the sake of storytelling, or why does there seem to be a negative connotation here?
 
In the story, when Inanna reaches the gatekeeper of the underworld, she is told at each of the 7 gates [chakras] to remove an article of clothing and that this serves to "strip her of her power" until she finally arrives at the end totally naked.

I imagine this has more to do with "purification" of the chakras, but she seems somehow humiliated/weakened by the whole ordeal. And is trapped, waiting to be saved by Enki.

Is this just for the sake of storytelling, or why does there seem to be a negative connotation here?
This reminds me of the myth of Persephone, who was abducted by Hades into the underworld. The sumerian equivalent is Erishkigal and there is a relation to the story you mentioned.

Be warned that wikipedia is controlled by the enemy and not everything you read is accurate. It's best to go to primary or secondary sources if available.


Inanna's Descent into the underworld
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In this poem, the goddess Inanna descends into the underworld, apparently seeking to extend her powers there. Ereshkigal is described as being Inanna's older sister. When Neti, the gatekeeper of the underworld, informs Ereshkigal that Inanna is at the gates and demanding to be let in, Ereshkigal responds by ordering Neti to bolt the seven gates of the underworld and to open each separately, but only after Inanna has removed one article of clothing.
Inanna proceeds through each gate, removing one article of clothing at each gate, and also loses her magic items to a nymph over the course of the journey. Finally, once she has gone through all seven gates, she finds herself naked and powerless, standing before the throne of Ereshkigal. The seven judges of the underworld judge Inanna and declare her to be guilty. Inanna is struck dead and her corpse is hung on a hook in the underworld for everyone to see.
Inanna's minister, Ninshubur, however, pleads with various gods and finally Enki agrees to rescue Inanna from the underworld. Enki sends two sexless beings down to the underworld to revive Inanna with the food and water of life. These beings escort Inanna up from the underworld, but a horde of angry demons follow Inanna, demanding to take someone else down to the underworld as Inanna's replacement. They initially want it to be Ninshubur, but Inanna rebukes this order, stating that she would not hand over a loyal subordinate to them. However, when she discovers that her husband, Dumuzid, has not mourned her death, she becomes ireful towards him and orders the demons to take him as her replacement.[11]

This story seems to be describing the necessity of cleaning the soul and chakras, as well as balancing them. Inanna here could be seen as the yin or feminine principle of the soul. Dumuzid, her husband, could be the yang/masculine principle. If these two are not united and in harmony then disaster results. One must not be above or below the other.

The quote here describes "sexless beings" and another describes them as "transgender". They are neither. They are the Gala, the priests of Sumeria. "Sexless" is likely a corruption, because remember that people who write about these things and translate them are not spiritual people, and these things are overseen by the enemy, so spiritual connotations are thrown out or missing. Sexless should be interpreted as neither masculine nor feminine, but both, since they are in balance, unified, perfected, as one would expect from the priestly class.

This seems to be a better site than wikipedia:
When Inanna comes upon her lover Dumuzi, however, and finds him “dressed in his shining…garments…on his magnificent throne” she becomes enraged that he, unlike the others, is not mourning her and orders the demons to seize him. Dumuzi appeals to the sun god Utu for help and is transformed into a snake in order to escape but, eventually, is caught and carried away to the underworld.

Dumuzi's sister, Geshtinanna, volunteers herself to go in his place and so it is decreed that Dumuzi will spend half the year in the underworld and Geshtinanna the other half. In this way, as, again with the myth of Demeter and Persephone, the seasons were explained.

There are themes of jealousy and betrayal here, which I believe reinforces the themes of imbalance between yin and yang within the soul.

Attempting to raise the kundalini with a dirty, imbalanced soul cannot succeed and can be damning. Inanna in this story tried this and needed to be revived by spiritual masters, the priests, and Enki. The seasons are allegories for polarity of the soul. The sushumna has been described as drifting from ida and pingala throughout the day, which is reflected in the periodic, rhythmic, closing of one nostril and opening of another.

The winter season is when it is in the ida, the summer is when it is in the pingala. The realm of the gods, "heaven" or olympus or etc, is always described as a lush and temperate paradise all year round, which alludes to fixation of the sushumna in a balanced and unified soul. There are layers of spiritual meaning in the myths.
 
This reminds me of the myth of Persephone, who was abducted by Hades into the underworld. The sumerian equivalent is Erishkigal and there is a relation to the story you mentioned.

Be warned that wikipedia is controlled by the enemy and not everything you read is accurate. It's best to go to primary or secondary sources if available.






This story seems to be describing the necessity of cleaning the soul and chakras, as well as balancing them. Inanna here could be seen as the yin or feminine principle of the soul. Dumuzid, her husband, could be the yang/masculine principle. If these two are not united and in harmony then disaster results. One must not be above or below the other.

The quote here describes "sexless beings" and another describes them as "transgender". They are neither. They are the Gala, the priests of Sumeria. "Sexless" is likely a corruption, because remember that people who write about these things and translate them are not spiritual people, and these things are overseen by the enemy, so spiritual connotations are thrown out or missing. Sexless should be interpreted as neither masculine nor feminine, but both, since they are in balance, unified, perfected, as one would expect from the priestly class.

This seems to be a better site than wikipedia:


There are themes of jealousy and betrayal here, which I believe reinforces the themes of imbalance between yin and yang within the soul.

Attempting to raise the kundalini with a dirty, imbalanced soul cannot succeed and can be damning. Inanna in this story tried this and needed to be revived by spiritual masters, the priests, and Enki. The seasons are allegories for polarity of the soul. The sushumna has been described as drifting from ida and pingala throughout the day, which is reflected in the periodic, rhythmic, closing of one nostril and opening of another.

The winter season is when it is in the ida, the summer is when it is in the pingala. The realm of the gods, "heaven" or olympus or etc, is always described as a lush and temperate paradise all year round, which alludes to fixation of the sushumna in a balanced and unified soul. There are layers of spiritual meaning in the myths.
These things are not to be taken literally. Inanna here is not literally Inanna. It's allegorical. I would like to write a better post about this at some point.
 
I've always seen this as symbolizing removing the false ego and pretensions from the soul. Part of removing the dross involves letting go of these, like delusions and fantasies about the self before one reaches the true reality of their being. It's a painful process for people to go through. This is why she seems weakened every time she loses something.

When we have our false ego shattered we often go through a period of depression afterwards.
 
Thanks, your points here make a lot of sense.

Would be very curious to read a more in-depth post from you.

Do you know how Inanna's husband and the need for a "replacement" plays into the myth?

Also, is ida and pingala same as yin and yang? What is sushuma? Do you have any accurate resources I could read up on this more in depth?

Very insightful, thank you.
 
Thanks, your points here make a lot of sense.

Would be very curious to read a more in-depth post from you.

Do you know how Inanna's husband and the need for a "replacement" plays into the myth?

Also, is ida and pingala same as yin and yang? What is sushuma? Do you have any accurate resources I could read up on this more in depth?


Very insightful, thank you.
(I misread your post and thought you were talking to me when you were talking to existential crisis. Oops. So, I worked on this in response. So, consider it a response in their place? I'm posting it anyway, even if it was sort of a mistake. Anyway, have a nice day.)

Thank you for your kind words. I'll add some more of my thoughts.

When I came up with my interpretation, I was inspired alchemy. Alchemy has a lot of imagery in common with mythology and is slightly more direct with its relation to the soul. It gets pretty blatant on how it involves developing the soul, and as far as I know, in modern books about alchemy, it isn't really hidden, though Christian imagery is included to throw people off.

Inannas descent into the underworld reflects the nigredo stage symbolized by death imagery, where "the old outmoded state of being is killed..."

In some versions of the myth, Inanna was punished for being arrogant and obnoxious and is killed for trespassing. Ereshkigal is like the saturn in this situation and her counterforce Enki, the higher self that cares for the soul and works to advance it and protect it from the negative effects of saturn. Enki persuades her like the way we work with Saturn in our advancement... this allows inanna to come back to life because he took responsibility and had mercy on her, giving her the water of life. I do wonder about the other gods who refused to help....

In the nigredo section of a dictionary of alchemical imagery by Abraham, it mentions the symbolic dead body being sprinkled by mercurial water so it could pass to the albedo to be resurrected.

I actually don't know what the rest means. I wondered if the need for a replacement or sacrifice was connected to needing to give something to get something in return. Sacrifice was often a word for just raising energy or meditating in the ancient world. It's also interesting that Dumuzid was chosen as a sacrifice for not mourning Inanna. This would connect to some sort of unworthiness or inattentiveness. Maybe it's connected to the fact that if we don't meditate, we will "fall" spiritually. I think the galla Demons may have represented the punishing aspects of Saturn, like refusing to take responsibility leads to one's personal demise.

Anyway you asked about the ida and pingala. They are the nadis representing the male and female parts of the soul. You can say they are yin and yang manifested in the human body, while yin and yang are more all-encompassing terms for universal male or female energy. The sushumna is the nadi that runs up the spine, the activation of which is important to advancement. If you don't already, you should practice kundalini yoga, which stimulates these parts of the soul and would give you a feel for them. Something about connecting the ida and pingala makes one more intelligent and allows two hemispheres of the brain to communicate more freely, and becoming a God involves permanently fusing them together. They terminate in the 6th chakra and tie into the pineal gland.

I wish I could give some books, but given how corrupted it all is.... The basics can be found through internet searches, but they would be corrupted as soon as they start going up to more advanced topics. A lot of knowledge does come from experience if one is patient. Practicing what we have on the jos, I, and many others with the help of the gods intuit spiritual knowledge with time. It's definitely experience based.
 
Yeah, fuck you, too.
Apologies, I didn't have time to read this until now.

Your analysis sounds pretty spot-on, and it's interesting how you relate it to the "nigredo part of the soul" which I assume represents the unknown/unchartered territory... I imagine some God's being depicted as black/dark skinned is symbolic of this as well.

How do you 'connect' the Ida and Pingala? Is it a specific meditation or a natural result of spiritual advancement?
 

Al Jilwah: Chapter IV

"It is my desire that all my followers unite in a bond of unity, lest those who are without prevail against them." - Satan

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