Welcome to our New Forums!

Our forums have been upgraded and expanded!

Welcome to Our New Forums

  • Our forums have been upgraded! You can read about this HERE

Yoga: Important Inversions

HPS Lydia

Moderator
Joined
Sep 20, 2017
Messages
3,915
Location
[email protected]
Yoga states that most common ailments can be cured by practicing certain yoga positions. In the body, there are several endocrine organs which need to be “bathed in blood” to absorb the nutrients, in order to function correctly. Otherwise, the body starts to deteriorate, and the brain does not function optimally.

Consult a doctor before attempting inversions. Those who have neck, shoulder, or spinal problems; are pregnant; considerably overweight or out of shape are advised not to attempt inversions. To modify, the asana called “waterfall”, otherwise known as “legs up the wall” is a suitable replacement and offers many benefits on its own.

I have included links to instructional videos, there are many more available online, longer ones with more prep work as well. Feel free to look around online for what might work better for you as an individual.


Waterfall (Viparita Karani) alleviates muscle cramps and fatigue from the legs and feet. This is excellent for preventing restless leg syndrome, “pins and needles” in the lower legs and feet from sitting too much, and helps to heal the legs from running or standing too much.

Simply lie on your back on the floor or your bed, and move your buttocks to the wall, with your legs resting straight up along the wall. You might want to start by sitting near the wall, and rolling onto your back while lifting your legs up. For further effects, you can place a bolster or pillow under your lower back to elevate your pelvis and legs further. Your arms can be however is comfortable to you- hands on your stomach, beside your hips, or 45 degrees out from your hips.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqIz8oMxRc


Shoulder stand (Sarvangasana) is called the mother of all asanas, as it nurtures and brings harmony to the body.

This inverted asana helps with headaches, colds, throat and nasal problems, short temper, irritation, insomnia, stomach pains, constipation, menstrual issues (it is not recommended to do while menstruating, however), low vitality, and much more. It is claimed to bring back vitality after illness, especially if done twice a day and held for 5 minutes, even longer if possible.

While this asana may look challenging especially to beginners, it is actually quite easy. And once you have the correct alignment, the body feels light and effortless when in this pose. This is perhaps the first asana that I truly mastered to the full extent of the pose (without modifications), and I highly recommend my fellow SS to learn it as well. It also helps to tone the core and legs.

In the correct position, the chest should not be deflated at all. The top of the chest should connect fully with the chin (do not try to bring the chin to the chest; instead, lift the chest to the chin). You should not feel any strain on your neck, your weight will be fully on your shoulders, with your triceps and elbows helping to balance. With experience, you will feel like you can take a nap in this pose, and easily remain in it for an extended length of time. It should also be easy enough to talk and swallow while in this pose, no strain on the throat at all.

Make sure your elbows are shoulder distance apart, and not splayed out further. The way to ensure this is to have them by your waist touching your torso when your body is still on the ground, and do not move them out as you life your torso up.

Instructional video, against the wall (the blanket is optional):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55ODZNzXvBE

Instructional video, no wall, traditional method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXiWyhmCMJ0

Instructional video, no wall, alternate method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjHTOW9x3WM


Headstand (Sirsasana), referred to as the father of all asanas.

BKS Iyengar states that when in proper form of the headstand, “This brings a feeling of lightness to the brain and complete relaxation to each part of the body.” However, if this pose is done daily without also performing shoulder stand daily, it can aggravate feelings of impatience and irritation.

My notes on the easiest way to learn this asana is to do it in a corner, where two walls will support you evenly, preventing you from falling to either side. Have suitable padding under your head, not a pillow, but a blanket or yoga mat folded evenly. If your padding is too cushioned it can make you uneven and thereby cause injury to your neck.

Tip to ensure your elbows are the the correct distance apart: hold each elbow with the opposite hand, your forearms will be along each other. You can then place your elbows on the floor, and rotate your hands and forearms to put them into position, as shown in the videos linked. This tip is applicable to the following asana as well.

Instructional video, with variations A & B, feel free to do this against a wall or a corner for additional safety:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrenTA2IFjI

Instructional video against a wall (ignore the mantra):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NrGYFkz7-U


Forearm stand (Pincha Mayurasana) is excellent for bringing balance to the body and developing the shoulder and chest muscles. This pose also increases focus and mental fortitude, highly recommended for any spiritual warrior.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdaU4rT8rhE


Handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana)
This asana is great for the heart and lungs, and the center (heart) chakra. You might find it easier to kick up against a wall. You might want to build up wrist and shoulder strength before attempting to practice this.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YX4nlXuqso
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=404388 time=1670414880 user_id=57]
Yoga states that most common ailments can be cured by practicing certain yoga positions. In the body, there are several endocrine organs which need to be “bathed in blood” to absorb the nutrients, in order to function correctly. Otherwise, the body starts to deteriorate, and the brain does not function optimally.

Consult a doctor before attempting inversions. Those who have neck, shoulder, or spinal problems; are pregnant; considerably overweight or out of shape are advised not to attempt inversions. To modify, the asana called “waterfall”, otherwise known as “legs up the wall” is a suitable replacement and offers many benefits on its own.

I have included links to instructional videos, there are many more available online, longer ones with more prep work as well. Feel free to look around online for what might work better for you as an individual.


Waterfall (Viparita Karani) alleviates muscle cramps and fatigue from the legs and feet. This is excellent for preventing restless leg syndrome, “pins and needles” in the lower legs and feet from sitting too much, and helps to heal the legs from running or standing too much.

Simply lie on your back on the floor or your bed, and move your buttocks to the wall, with your legs resting straight up along the wall. You might want to start by sitting near the wall, and rolling onto your back while lifting your legs up. For further effects, you can place a bolster or pillow under your lower back to elevate your pelvis and legs further. Your arms can be however is comfortable to you- hands on your stomach, beside your hips, or 45 degrees out from your hips.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqIz8oMxRc


Shoulder stand (Sarvangasana) is called the mother of all asanas, as it nurtures and brings harmony to the body.

This inverted asana helps with headaches, colds, throat and nasal problems, short temper, irritation, insomnia, stomach pains, constipation, menstrual issues (it is not recommended to do while menstruating, however), low vitality, and much more. It is claimed to bring back vitality after illness, especially if done twice a day and held for 5 minutes, even longer if possible.

While this asana may look challenging especially to beginners, it is actually quite easy. And once you have the correct alignment, the body feels light and effortless when in this pose. This is perhaps the first asana that I truly mastered to the full extent of the pose (without modifications), and I highly recommend my fellow SS to learn it as well. It also helps to tone the core and legs.

In the correct position, the chest should not be deflated at all. The top of the chest should connect fully with the chin (do not try to bring the chin to the chest; instead, lift the chest to the chin). You should not feel any strain on your neck, your weight will be fully on your shoulders, with your triceps and elbows helping to balance. With experience, you will feel like you can take a nap in this pose, and easily remain in it for an extended length of time. It should also be easy enough to talk and swallow while in this pose, no strain on the throat at all.

Make sure your elbows are shoulder distance apart, and not splayed out further. The way to ensure this is to have them by your waist touching your torso when your body is still on the ground, and do not move them out as you life your torso up.

Instructional video, against the wall (the blanket is optional):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55ODZNzXvBE

Instructional video, no wall, traditional method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXiWyhmCMJ0

Instructional video, no wall, alternate method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjHTOW9x3WM


Headstand (Sirsasana), referred to as the father of all asanas.

BKS Iyengar states that when in proper form of the headstand, “This brings a feeling of lightness to the brain and complete relaxation to each part of the body.” However, if this pose is done daily without also performing shoulder stand daily, it can aggravate feelings of impatience and irritation.

My notes on the easiest way to learn this asana is to do it in a corner, where two walls will support you evenly, preventing you from falling to either side. Have suitable padding under your head, not a pillow, but a blanket or yoga mat folded evenly. If your padding is too cushioned it can make you uneven and thereby cause injury to your neck.

Tip to ensure your elbows are the the correct distance apart: hold each elbow with the opposite hand, your forearms will be along each other. You can then place your elbows on the floor, and rotate your hands and forearms to put them into position, as shown in the videos linked. This tip is applicable to the following asana as well.

Instructional video, with variations A & B, feel free to do this against a wall or a corner for additional safety:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrenTA2IFjI

Instructional video against a wall (ignore the mantra):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NrGYFkz7-U


Forearm stand (Pincha Mayurasana) is excellent for bringing balance to the body and developing the shoulder and chest muscles. This pose also increases focus and mental fortitude, highly recommended for any spiritual warrior.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdaU4rT8rhE


Handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana)
This asana is great for the heart and lungs, and the center (heart) chakra. You might find it easier to kick up against a wall. You might want to build up wrist and shoulder strength before attempting to practice this.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YX4nlXuqso

Thank you for sharing this information.

As I am new here... I can say that you have awakened my interest in yoga and spirituality.

By the way, if you have time to answer... I have a question:

Is there a limit in doing Sarvangasana? I mean something like 7-14 days and there we just don't do it anymore, unless problems come again? Or isn't there anything like what have I previously stated?

Thank you in advance :)
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=404388 time=1670414880 user_id=57]
Yoga states that most common ailments can be cured by practicing certain yoga positions. In the body, there are several endocrine organs which need to be “bathed in blood” to absorb the nutrients, in order to function correctly. Otherwise, the body starts to deteriorate, and the brain does not function optimally.

Consult a doctor before attempting inversions. Those who have neck, shoulder, or spinal problems; are pregnant; considerably overweight or out of shape are advised not to attempt inversions. To modify, the asana called “waterfall”, otherwise known as “legs up the wall” is a suitable replacement and offers many benefits on its own.

I have included links to instructional videos, there are many more available online, longer ones with more prep work as well. Feel free to look around online for what might work better for you as an individual.


Waterfall (Viparita Karani) alleviates muscle cramps and fatigue from the legs and feet. This is excellent for preventing restless leg syndrome, “pins and needles” in the lower legs and feet from sitting too much, and helps to heal the legs from running or standing too much.

Simply lie on your back on the floor or your bed, and move your buttocks to the wall, with your legs resting straight up along the wall. You might want to start by sitting near the wall, and rolling onto your back while lifting your legs up. For further effects, you can place a bolster or pillow under your lower back to elevate your pelvis and legs further. Your arms can be however is comfortable to you- hands on your stomach, beside your hips, or 45 degrees out from your hips.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqIz8oMxRc


Shoulder stand (Sarvangasana) is called the mother of all asanas, as it nurtures and brings harmony to the body.

This inverted asana helps with headaches, colds, throat and nasal problems, short temper, irritation, insomnia, stomach pains, constipation, menstrual issues (it is not recommended to do while menstruating, however), low vitality, and much more. It is claimed to bring back vitality after illness, especially if done twice a day and held for 5 minutes, even longer if possible.

While this asana may look challenging especially to beginners, it is actually quite easy. And once you have the correct alignment, the body feels light and effortless when in this pose. This is perhaps the first asana that I truly mastered to the full extent of the pose (without modifications), and I highly recommend my fellow SS to learn it as well. It also helps to tone the core and legs.

In the correct position, the chest should not be deflated at all. The top of the chest should connect fully with the chin (do not try to bring the chin to the chest; instead, lift the chest to the chin). You should not feel any strain on your neck, your weight will be fully on your shoulders, with your triceps and elbows helping to balance. With experience, you will feel like you can take a nap in this pose, and easily remain in it for an extended length of time. It should also be easy enough to talk and swallow while in this pose, no strain on the throat at all.

Make sure your elbows are shoulder distance apart, and not splayed out further. The way to ensure this is to have them by your waist touching your torso when your body is still on the ground, and do not move them out as you life your torso up.

Instructional video, against the wall (the blanket is optional):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55ODZNzXvBE

Instructional video, no wall, traditional method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXiWyhmCMJ0

Instructional video, no wall, alternate method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjHTOW9x3WM


Headstand (Sirsasana), referred to as the father of all asanas.

BKS Iyengar states that when in proper form of the headstand, “This brings a feeling of lightness to the brain and complete relaxation to each part of the body.” However, if this pose is done daily without also performing shoulder stand daily, it can aggravate feelings of impatience and irritation.

My notes on the easiest way to learn this asana is to do it in a corner, where two walls will support you evenly, preventing you from falling to either side. Have suitable padding under your head, not a pillow, but a blanket or yoga mat folded evenly. If your padding is too cushioned it can make you uneven and thereby cause injury to your neck.

Tip to ensure your elbows are the the correct distance apart: hold each elbow with the opposite hand, your forearms will be along each other. You can then place your elbows on the floor, and rotate your hands and forearms to put them into position, as shown in the videos linked. This tip is applicable to the following asana as well.

Instructional video, with variations A & B, feel free to do this against a wall or a corner for additional safety:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrenTA2IFjI

Instructional video against a wall (ignore the mantra):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NrGYFkz7-U


Forearm stand (Pincha Mayurasana) is excellent for bringing balance to the body and developing the shoulder and chest muscles. This pose also increases focus and mental fortitude, highly recommended for any spiritual warrior.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdaU4rT8rhE


Handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana)
This asana is great for the heart and lungs, and the center (heart) chakra. You might find it easier to kick up against a wall. You might want to build up wrist and shoulder strength before attempting to practice this.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YX4nlXuqso

Thank you sister :D 😘😘😘😘😘
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=404388 time=1670414880 user_id=57]
Yoga states that most common ailments can be cured by practicing certain yoga positions. In the body, there are several endocrine organs which need to be “bathed in blood” to absorb the nutrients, in order to function correctly. Otherwise, the body starts to deteriorate, and the brain does not function optimally.

Consult a doctor before attempting inversions. Those who have neck, shoulder, or spinal problems; are pregnant; considerably overweight or out of shape are advised not to attempt inversions. To modify, the asana called “waterfall”, otherwise known as “legs up the wall” is a suitable replacement and offers many benefits on its own.

I have included links to instructional videos, there are many more available online, longer ones with more prep work as well. Feel free to look around online for what might work better for you as an individual.


Waterfall (Viparita Karani) alleviates muscle cramps and fatigue from the legs and feet. This is excellent for preventing restless leg syndrome, “pins and needles” in the lower legs and feet from sitting too much, and helps to heal the legs from running or standing too much.

Simply lie on your back on the floor or your bed, and move your buttocks to the wall, with your legs resting straight up along the wall. You might want to start by sitting near the wall, and rolling onto your back while lifting your legs up. For further effects, you can place a bolster or pillow under your lower back to elevate your pelvis and legs further. Your arms can be however is comfortable to you- hands on your stomach, beside your hips, or 45 degrees out from your hips.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqIz8oMxRc


Shoulder stand (Sarvangasana) is called the mother of all asanas, as it nurtures and brings harmony to the body.

This inverted asana helps with headaches, colds, throat and nasal problems, short temper, irritation, insomnia, stomach pains, constipation, menstrual issues (it is not recommended to do while menstruating, however), low vitality, and much more. It is claimed to bring back vitality after illness, especially if done twice a day and held for 5 minutes, even longer if possible.

While this asana may look challenging especially to beginners, it is actually quite easy. And once you have the correct alignment, the body feels light and effortless when in this pose. This is perhaps the first asana that I truly mastered to the full extent of the pose (without modifications), and I highly recommend my fellow SS to learn it as well. It also helps to tone the core and legs.

In the correct position, the chest should not be deflated at all. The top of the chest should connect fully with the chin (do not try to bring the chin to the chest; instead, lift the chest to the chin). You should not feel any strain on your neck, your weight will be fully on your shoulders, with your triceps and elbows helping to balance. With experience, you will feel like you can take a nap in this pose, and easily remain in it for an extended length of time. It should also be easy enough to talk and swallow while in this pose, no strain on the throat at all.

Make sure your elbows are shoulder distance apart, and not splayed out further. The way to ensure this is to have them by your waist touching your torso when your body is still on the ground, and do not move them out as you life your torso up.

Instructional video, against the wall (the blanket is optional):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55ODZNzXvBE

Instructional video, no wall, traditional method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXiWyhmCMJ0

Instructional video, no wall, alternate method:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjHTOW9x3WM


Headstand (Sirsasana), referred to as the father of all asanas.

BKS Iyengar states that when in proper form of the headstand, “This brings a feeling of lightness to the brain and complete relaxation to each part of the body.” However, if this pose is done daily without also performing shoulder stand daily, it can aggravate feelings of impatience and irritation.

My notes on the easiest way to learn this asana is to do it in a corner, where two walls will support you evenly, preventing you from falling to either side. Have suitable padding under your head, not a pillow, but a blanket or yoga mat folded evenly. If your padding is too cushioned it can make you uneven and thereby cause injury to your neck.

Tip to ensure your elbows are the the correct distance apart: hold each elbow with the opposite hand, your forearms will be along each other. You can then place your elbows on the floor, and rotate your hands and forearms to put them into position, as shown in the videos linked. This tip is applicable to the following asana as well.

Instructional video, with variations A & B, feel free to do this against a wall or a corner for additional safety:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrenTA2IFjI

Instructional video against a wall (ignore the mantra):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NrGYFkz7-U


Forearm stand (Pincha Mayurasana) is excellent for bringing balance to the body and developing the shoulder and chest muscles. This pose also increases focus and mental fortitude, highly recommended for any spiritual warrior.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdaU4rT8rhE


Handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana)
This asana is great for the heart and lungs, and the center (heart) chakra. You might find it easier to kick up against a wall. You might want to build up wrist and shoulder strength before attempting to practice this.

Instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YX4nlXuqso

Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.
 
Shadowcat said:
Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.

Is not pressed if you have strong shoulders and traps muscle. If you are going to gym put some shoulders exercise in your schedule, if not the simplest way is to search 'push ups for shoulders' and you will see the difference. And of course, there are some exercises for neck muscles
 
Henu the Great said:
Shadowcat said:
Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.
There are three points of contact and when done correctly the weight is distributed on the hands and the head evenly. Tripod for example does not feel heavy in the neck at all despite that it can look like it.

It really does look like it :shock:
 
Henu the Great said:
Shadowcat said:
Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.
There are three points of contact and when done correctly the weight is distributed on the hands and the head evenly. Tripod for example does not feel heavy in the neck at all despite that it can look like it.

Ideally you should have something like 10-20% of your weight on you head and the rest be supported by your forearms. I however think I have quite a bit more, since if I press down to take more weight on my forearms I lose balance. Still I don't think its super detrimental, but be very careful, spinal injuries are the worst.

I've never tried the tripod, I too felt like it would be too much weight on the neck, but if Henu says it's not too bad, I'll take his word.
 
So, aside from our regular Hatha routine, can we isolate these inverted poses and do them for extended periods of time?

Example, I do Hatha in the AM and PM, but before bed could I do shoulder stand for 5 minutes or more as well? (Without anything else at that time)
 
BlueLake666 said:
Thank you for sharing this information.

As I am new here... I can say that you have awakened my interest in yoga and spirituality.

By the way, if you have time to answer... I have a question:

Is there a limit in doing Sarvangasana? I mean something like 7-14 days and there we just don't do it anymore, unless problems come again? Or isn't there anything like what have I previously stated?

Thank you in advance :)

You can do it every day! I do it nearly every day, have been for many years, except if I had an injury. But if you wanted to do it for the health effects, then you can do it a few times a day until the problem is resolved. Go by how you feel :)

Shadowcat said:
Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.

No, when you are perfectly balanced, there is no weight felt. If a person is not in the pose correctly then it can definitely be bad for the neck, but when done correctly, there is no problem.

GoldenxChild1 said:
So, aside from our regular Hatha routine, can we isolate these inverted poses and do them for extended periods of time?

Example, I do Hatha in the AM and PM, but before bed could I do shoulder stand for 5 minutes or more as well? (Without anything else at that time)

Yes you can do it all by itself, whenever you feel the need to do so :)
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=404585 time=1670485097 user_id=57]
BlueLake666 said:
Thank you for sharing this information.

As I am new here... I can say that you have awakened my interest in yoga and spirituality.

By the way, if you have time to answer... I have a question:

Is there a limit in doing Sarvangasana? I mean something like 7-14 days and there we just don't do it anymore, unless problems come again? Or isn't there anything like what have I previously stated?

Thank you in advance :)

You can do it every day! I do it nearly every day, have been for many years, except if I had an injury. But if you wanted to do it for the health effects, then you can do it a few times a day until the problem is resolved. Go by how you feel :)

Shadowcat said:
Great post Lydia :). I have a question though can't a headstand be dangerous from all the weight being pressed onto the neck like that? I have always preferred a handstand instead myself.

No, when you are perfectly balanced, there is no weight felt. If a person is not in the pose correctly then it can definitely be bad for the neck, but when done correctly, there is no problem.

GoldenxChild1 said:
So, aside from our regular Hatha routine, can we isolate these inverted poses and do them for extended periods of time?

Example, I do Hatha in the AM and PM, but before bed could I do shoulder stand for 5 minutes or more as well? (Without anything else at that time)

Yes you can do it all by itself, whenever you feel the need to do so :)

Thank you for answering my question :)

It really helps me in the beginning of doing great Spiritual works such as yoga :)

Hail Satan
 
Powerofjustice said:
I've never tried the tripod, I too felt like it would be too much weight on the neck, but if Henu says it's not too bad, I'll take his word.
Shadowcat said:
It really does look like it :shock:
You guys really need to try it out.

When I began with yoga in earnest I was not able to comfortably and correctly do a headstand (even against a wall) so I just did a tripod in the middle of a room. And while I did not have the correct balance all the time just repeating it over and over I learned the correct balance and moved onto the headstand (first against a wall, then without) eventually.
 
So I decided to isolate the shoulder stand asana before bed, I made it 4 mins and 40 seconds, when first starting out is it normal for your entire body to burn and shake during most of the time? First 30 seconds were good, but afterwards I had to keep readjusting my hands as they were sliding, and my posture was breaking
 
GoldenxChild1 said:
So I decided to isolate the shoulder stand asana before bed, I made it 4 mins and 40 seconds, when first starting out is it normal for your entire body to burn and shake during most of the time? First 30 seconds were good, but afterwards I had to keep readjusting my hands as they were sliding, and my posture was breaking

When the body burns and shakes during any asana, this is a sign of your progress. Energy channels are opening, energy is flowing where it has never coursed through before in your current life, and mental blocks can be removed. Great work, keep it up, and enjoy the meditation after, this will help to reap the benefits of your asana practice :)
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=404760 time=1670568146 user_id=57]
GoldenxChild1 said:
So I decided to isolate the shoulder stand asana before bed, I made it 4 mins and 40 seconds, when first starting out is it normal for your entire body to burn and shake during most of the time? First 30 seconds were good, but afterwards I had to keep readjusting my hands as they were sliding, and my posture was breaking

When the body burns and shakes during any asana, this is a sign of your progress. Energy channels are opening, energy is flowing where it has never coursed through before in your current life, and mental blocks can be removed. Great work, keep it up, and enjoy the meditation after, this will help to reap the benefits of your asana practice :)

Great, will do. I find myself doing a lot of Yantra and Mantras, but not as much yoga except for the minimum, I don't want to miss out.

Out of the 8 fold I definitely see that a balance is the way upwards, at least faster.

Thank-you milday
 
Yoga states that most common ailments can be cured by practicing certain yoga positions. In the body, there are several endocrine organs which need to be “bathed in blood” to absorb the nutrients, in order to function correctly. Otherwise, the body starts to deteriorate, and the brain does not function optimally.

Consult a doctor before attempting inversions. Those who have neck, shoulder, or spinal problems; are pregnant; considerably overweight or out of shape are advised not to attempt inversions. To modify, the asana called “waterfall”, otherwise known as “legs up the wall” is a suitable replacement and offers many benefits on its own.

I have included links to instructional videos, there are many more available online, longer ones with more prep work as well. Feel free to look around online for what might work better for you as an individual.


Waterfall (Viparita Karani) alleviates muscle cramps and fatigue from the legs and feet. This is excellent for preventing restless leg syndrome, “pins and needles” in the lower legs and feet from sitting too much, and helps to heal the legs from running or standing too much.

Simply lie on your back on the floor or your bed, and move your buttocks to the wall, with your legs resting straight up along the wall. You might want to start by sitting near the wall, and rolling onto your back while lifting your legs up. For further effects, you can place a bolster or pillow under your lower back to elevate your pelvis and legs further. Your arms can be however is comfortable to you- hands on your stomach, beside your hips, or 45 degrees out from your hips.

Instructional video:


Shoulder stand (Sarvangasana) is called the mother of all asanas, as it nurtures and brings harmony to the body.

This inverted asana helps with headaches, colds, throat and nasal problems, short temper, irritation, insomnia, stomach pains, constipation, menstrual issues (it is not recommended to do while menstruating, however), low vitality, and much more. It is claimed to bring back vitality after illness, especially if done twice a day and held for 5 minutes, even longer if possible.

While this asana may look challenging especially to beginners, it is actually quite easy. And once you have the correct alignment, the body feels light and effortless when in this pose. This is perhaps the first asana that I truly mastered to the full extent of the pose (without modifications), and I highly recommend my fellow SS to learn it as well. It also helps to tone the core and legs.

In the correct position, the chest should not be deflated at all. The top of the chest should connect fully with the chin (do not try to bring the chin to the chest; instead, lift the chest to the chin). You should not feel any strain on your neck, your weight will be fully on your shoulders, with your triceps and elbows helping to balance. With experience, you will feel like you can take a nap in this pose, and easily remain in it for an extended length of time. It should also be easy enough to talk and swallow while in this pose, no strain on the throat at all.

Make sure your elbows are shoulder distance apart, and not splayed out further. The way to ensure this is to have them by your waist touching your torso when your body is still on the ground, and do not move them out as you life your torso up.

Instructional video, against the wall (the blanket is optional):

Instructional video, no wall, traditional method:

Instructional video, no wall, alternate method:


Headstand (Sirsasana), referred to as the father of all asanas.

BKS Iyengar states that when in proper form of the headstand, “This brings a feeling of lightness to the brain and complete relaxation to each part of the body.” However, if this pose is done daily without also performing shoulder stand daily, it can aggravate feelings of impatience and irritation.

My notes on the easiest way to learn this asana is to do it in a corner, where two walls will support you evenly, preventing you from falling to either side. Have suitable padding under your head, not a pillow, but a blanket or yoga mat folded evenly. If your padding is too cushioned it can make you uneven and thereby cause injury to your neck.

Tip to ensure your elbows are the the correct distance apart: hold each elbow with the opposite hand, your forearms will be along each other. You can then place your elbows on the floor, and rotate your hands and forearms to put them into position, as shown in the videos linked. This tip is applicable to the following asana as well.

Instructional video, with variations A & B, feel free to do this against a wall or a corner for additional safety:

Instructional video against a wall (ignore the mantra):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NrGYFkz7-U


Forearm stand (Pincha Mayurasana) is excellent for bringing balance to the body and developing the shoulder and chest muscles. This pose also increases focus and mental fortitude, highly recommended for any spiritual warrior.

Instructional video:


Handstand (Adho Mukha Vrksasana)
This asana is great for the heart and lungs, and the center (heart) chakra. You might find it easier to kick up against a wall. You might want to build up wrist and shoulder strength before attempting to practice this.

Instructional video:
So Lydia do yoga helps built strength and flexibility and makes us way stronger
 

Al Jilwah: Chapter IV

"It is my desire that all my followers unite in a bond of unity, lest those who are without prevail against them." - Satan

Back
Top