Finnish religion

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Valontuoja
Posts: 72
Location: Greater Finland

Finnish religion

Postby Valontuoja » Fri Feb 16, 2018 11:16 am

This writing is a basic introduction to Finnish religion and mythology and how it ties into other ancient religions. This could be especially of interest to related groups such as Estonians and the Finnic peoples of Russia. Also this serves as a general topic for discussions about Finnish culture, mythology and history.

Finnish people are one of the only non-Indo European Whites. It belongs to the Finno-Ugric (Uralic) language group. Many Finnic peoples remained pagan for a long time, some are still today practicing their ancient religion like the Mari people living in Russia. Finland got conquered by catholic Sweden in the medieval times, Karelia has mostly been part of orthodox Russia. Some remains of the ancient religion remained to the 19th century despite the church trying to get rid of it. Here is an article about one Finnic people that is still pagan:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in- ... 7705cf9aff

Finns had their own word for vril, witch-power. Väki (nowadays meaning is "people") meant energy (different places have their own väki), power and especially magickal power. A powerful mage who had lots of energy was called väkevä.

Kalevala, Finnish national epic, is based around old poems and myths. It is known that when the poems were collected there existed different versions. Elias Lönnrot who wrote Kalevala in the 19th century around the poems he had collected did censor and leave out parts, especially ones, that were against xian sexual morals. Majority of the original magickal songs are available in Suomen kansan vanhat runot ("the ancient poems of the Finnish people") a huge 34-part work. It doesn't include closely related Estonian poems. Link to SKVR in the end of this writing. Note: Finnish word Runo (poem) comes from Proto-Germanic rūnō and is related to English rune. The Finnic poem singing obviously relates to vibration.

The Finnish magic from the text differs from Scandinavian ones as the magic in Scandinavian traditions wasn't as tied to poem singing as in Finnic mythology. The powerful words of Finnish mage were called "luotteet" (possibly from word luottaa meaning "trust" as the knowledge was passed on from a master or relative). In Kalevala poems if a luote was missing the mage had to visit place of the death or some other mage to get to know the powerful word. It is interesting to note Scandinavian myths descripe practitioners of seiðr (magic) usually as Sámi or Finns. In Scandinavia Finland was known as land of the giants (Jotland). Rune Thurisaz is closely related to Finnish entity or god of war Turisas/Tursas (Iku-Turso), the rune means giant in Norse mythology. Norse mythology mentions giants that rules over Finland for example Fornjót, the king of Gotland, Kvenland and Finland.

Kalevala tells mostly about two places Pohjola ("the North") ruled by an evil witch called Louhi. She has several daughters (Pohjolan tyttäret) who many want to marry in the epic. In order to get married to her daughters one has to survive a hard journey to Pohjola and there he has to survive from impossible sounding guests. Another important location is Väinölä, homeland of legendary smith Seppo Ilmarinen and great mage Väinämöinen. This seems like an allegory of the union of lower male chakras with the upper chakras.

Heinrich Himmler, a great friend of Finnish people, send the Ahnenerbe to do research expedition in Karelia. The expedition was led by a Finnish nobleman Yrjö von Grönhagen, along with him traveled German musicologist Fritz Bose who came to record pagan chants. They managed to find a poem singer Timo Lipitsä whose picture, taken by von Grönhagen, ended up decorating the wall of Himmler's workroom. The research group also recorded a Kantele player Hannes Vornanen and a witch Miron-Aku. Himmler ordered 10 traditional kantele instruments from Finland in order to make copies for SS-men. Himmler visited Finland three times during the war against our common enemy.

"Where a Finnish SS-man stood, the enemy was always defeated."
- Heinrich Himmler

Sources, more reading and resources:

The following material is mostly in Finnish as it is quite difficult to find English resources when I have read the materials in Finnish. Also here is lots of lies in the sources especially about "muh holocaust".

(Finnish translation of) Heather Pringle's The Masterplan: Himmler's Scholars and the Holocaust
(Himmlerin suuri suunnitelma arjalaisen herrakansan etsintä)

Suomen kansan vanhat runot:
https://skvr.fi/

Estonian runic song database:
http://www.folklore.ee/regilaul/andmebaas

Suomen kansan muinaisia loitsurunoja:
https://archive.org/details/suomenkansanmui00lngoog

Wikipedia pages of interest:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Norse ... _shamanism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thurisaz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fornj%C3%B3t
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luotes
https://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4ki_(mytologia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorary_Aryan#Finns
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%A4ym ... scriptions

(Finnish news stories)

SS-groups got kantele instruments from Finland (article in Finnish):
https://www.is.fi/kotimaa/art-2000000707916.html

This article contains lots of bullshit but is interesting to read about Himmler's visites to Finland:
https://www.aamulehti.fi/ihmiset/pahama ... 200288419/

User avatar
Sacred_Practice9
Posts: 126

Re: Finnish religion

Postby Sacred_Practice9 » Fri Feb 16, 2018 3:50 pm

Valontuoja wrote:This writing is a basic introduction to Finnish religion and mythology and how it ties into other ancient religions. This could be especially of interest to related groups such as Estonians and the Finnic peoples of Russia. Also this serves as a general topic for discussions about Finnish culture, mythology and history.

Finnish people are one of the only non-Indo European Whites. It belongs to the Finno-Ugric (Uralic) language group. Many Finnic peoples remained pagan for a long time, some are still today practicing their ancient religion like the Mari people living in Russia. Finland got conquered by catholic Sweden in the medieval times, Karelia has mostly been part of orthodox Russia. Some remains of the ancient religion remained to the 19th century despite the church trying to get rid of it. Here is an article about one Finnic people that is still pagan:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in- ... 7705cf9aff

Finns had their own word for vril, witch-power. Väki (nowadays meaning is "people") meant energy (different places have their own väki), power and especially magickal power. A powerful mage who had lots of energy was called väkevä.

Kalevala, Finnish national epic, is based around old poems and myths. It is known that when the poems were collected there existed different versions. Elias Lönnrot who wrote Kalevala in the 19th century around the poems he had collected did censor and leave out parts, especially ones, that were against xian sexual morals. Majority of the original magickal songs are available in Suomen kansan vanhat runot ("the ancient poems of the Finnish people") a huge 34-part work. It doesn't include closely related Estonian poems. Link to SKVR in the end of this writing. Note: Finnish word Runo (poem) comes from Proto-Germanic rūnō and is related to English rune. The Finnic poem singing obviously relates to vibration.

The Finnish magic from the text differs from Scandinavian ones as the magic in Scandinavian traditions wasn't as tied to poem singing as in Finnic mythology. The powerful words of Finnish mage were called "luotteet" (possibly from word luottaa meaning "trust" as the knowledge was passed on from a master or relative). In Kalevala poems if a luote was missing the mage had to visit place of the death or some other mage to get to know the powerful word. It is interesting to note Scandinavian myths descripe practitioners of seiðr (magic) usually as Sámi or Finns. In Scandinavia Finland was known as land of the giants (Jotland). Rune Thurisaz is closely related to Finnish entity or god of war Turisas/Tursas (Iku-Turso), the rune means giant in Norse mythology. Norse mythology mentions giants that rules over Finland for example Fornjót, the king of Gotland, Kvenland and Finland.

Kalevala tells mostly about two places Pohjola ("the North") ruled by an evil witch called Louhi. She has several daughters (Pohjolan tyttäret) who many want to marry in the epic. In order to get married to her daughters one has to survive a hard journey to Pohjola and there he has to survive from impossible sounding guests. Another important location is Väinölä, homeland of legendary smith Seppo Ilmarinen and great mage Väinämöinen. This seems like an allegory of the union of lower male chakras with the upper chakras.

Heinrich Himmler, a great friend of Finnish people, send the Ahnenerbe to do research expedition in Karelia. The expedition was led by a Finnish nobleman Yrjö von Grönhagen, along with him traveled German musicologist Fritz Bose who came to record pagan chants. They managed to find a poem singer Timo Lipitsä whose picture, taken by von Grönhagen, ended up decorating the wall of Himmler's workroom. The research group also recorded a Kantele player Hannes Vornanen and a witch Miron-Aku. Himmler ordered 10 traditional kantele instruments from Finland in order to make copies for SS-men. Himmler visited Finland three times during the war against our common enemy.

"Where a Finnish SS-man stood, the enemy was always defeated."
- Heinrich Himmler

Sources, more reading and resources:

The following material is mostly in Finnish as it is quite difficult to find English resources when I have read the materials in Finnish. Also here is lots of lies in the sources especially about "muh holocaust".

(Finnish translation of) Heather Pringle's The Masterplan: Himmler's Scholars and the Holocaust
(Himmlerin suuri suunnitelma arjalaisen herrakansan etsintä)

Suomen kansan vanhat runot:
https://skvr.fi/

Estonian runic song database:
http://www.folklore.ee/regilaul/andmebaas

Suomen kansan muinaisia loitsurunoja:
https://archive.org/details/suomenkansanmui00lngoog

Wikipedia pages of interest:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Norse ... _shamanism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thurisaz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fornj%C3%B3t
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luotes
https://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4ki_(mytologia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorary_Aryan#Finns
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%A4ym ... scriptions

(Finnish news stories)

SS-groups got kantele instruments from Finland (article in Finnish):
https://www.is.fi/kotimaa/art-2000000707916.html

This article contains lots of bullshit but is interesting to read about Himmler's visites to Finland:
https://www.aamulehti.fi/ihmiset/pahama ... 200288419/


That's incredibly interesting, I've got a lot of Finnish ancestry as well as some family in Finland so this is particularly great to read.

Great post.
The gate[s] of heaven
The bars of heaven
The fastenings of heaven
The bolts of heaven
Thou openest
Thou pullest back
Thou loosenest
Thou removest

Valontuoja
Posts: 72
Location: Greater Finland

Re: Finnish religion

Postby Valontuoja » Sat Feb 17, 2018 7:31 pm

Väinämöinen is the main character of Kalevala. His name is thought to originate from "väinä" and his epithet is "suvantolainen" both of which means stream pool (a very deep part of a river, suvanto). He was also a very skilled boat builder and according to tradition (Väinämöisen kiellot, commandments/prohibitions from Väinämöinen) he prohibits improper behavior in boats. He is the most powerful sage known in Kalevala, an old man who is possibly immortal (tietäjä iänikuinen = sage everlasting). In the end of Kalevala (very heavily xianized story about virgin giving birth to a bastard whom Väinämöinen orders to be executed but who is instead declared as king of Karelia) he leaves the world willingly and promises to return later.

From what I have found out Finns didn't really have any significant snakes in their mythology - bear worship was more common. Here is however a story in which Väinämöinen travels to land of the death to gain words of power ("luotteet", explained in first post)) he needs in order to finish constructing his boat. This is from Kalevala poem 16. Väinämöinen travels through hard terrain for several (3) weeks until he comes to a river of death. Tuonela (land of the dead) is an island. Tuonen tytti (or Tuonen piika, maid of death) is a female ferryman that he needs help from to get over the river.

Väinämöinen gets to the place of death but they aren't willing to share their knowledge with living people. Väinämöinen escapes from Tuonela by turning into a snake and swimming away in the river of death. This is possibly a Finnish depiction of the Nigredo stage of Magnum opus where one has to die in order to become immortal. Same thing is symbolized by SS-men's skull and bones symbol according to JoS.

Väinämöisen kiellot:
https://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4in ... en_kiellot

Satanic symbols:
http://www.satanslibrary.org/666BlackSu ... ymbols.htm

Savitar
Posts: 93

Re: Finnish religion

Postby Savitar » Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:04 pm

I heared there's a Finnish deity called Simo Hayha 8-)

Image
"I feel awe of the Gods, I love, I revere, I venerate them,
and in short have the same feelings towards them
as one would have towards kind master,
or teachers or fathers or guardians or any beings of that sort"
-Julianus Imperator

Valontuoja
Posts: 72
Location: Greater Finland

Re: Finnish religion

Postby Valontuoja » Mon Feb 19, 2018 1:04 am

I haven't read the Lord of the Rings as I'm not into fiction. It has however been influenced by Finno-Karelian mythology as the following documentary shows starting in 34:00. This short part of the documentary shows a real poem singer and explains the plot of Kalevala and how it ties into the world created by Tolkien. Feel free to skip to 34:00 and stop watching when he begins to talk about "the evil nazis".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OXCwkLuUF0

The curse upon Iron by Estonian composer Veljo Tormis:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhjPGGSuuNM

I love this piece of art. Estonians are a great nation that still prefer the faith of their ancestors over xianity.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-14635021
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ntry-world

Valontuoja
Posts: 72
Location: Greater Finland

Re: Finnish religion

Postby Valontuoja » Mon Feb 19, 2018 1:47 am

Sacred_Practice9 wrote:That's incredibly interesting, I've got a lot of Finnish ancestry as well as some family in Finland so this is particularly great to read.

Great post.


You have some great heritage. Thanks a lot for your comment, it required me hours of work and study to write this short introduction. I will continue writing when I learn more or find some great material. I'm currently studying Mythology of all races volume IV (Finnish and Siberian) to see if it's of any use. (https://archive.org/details/MythologyOfAllRacesVolume4)

"After their first conflict vvith the Russians, the Finns applied to me, proposing that their country should become a German protectorate. I don't regret having rejected this offer. As a matter of fact, the heroic attitude of this people, vvhich has spent a hundred of the six hundred years of its history in fighting, deserves the greatest respect. It is infinitely better to have this people of heroes as allies than to incorporate it in the Germanic Reich"
- Hitler's Table talks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MoQr52oxqU

Savitar wrote:I heared there's a Finnish deity called Simo Hayha 8-)


Here is also a god called Lauri Törni (Larry Thorne for 'mericans) who fought against communism in Finland, Germany and Vietnam yet neither of these heroes could stop our enemies from stealing our ancestral lands of Karelia and turning our cities into shit. Pictures related:

http://varlamov.ru/2334638.html

One of my only wishes is that one day we get back what belongs to us so we can repair it and repopulate the areas that our ancestors have lived in. I honestly believe that after our great spiritual war the NS government of Russia might be interested to compensate for the communist crimes and misery it has caused under jewish leadership. (http://prokarelia.net/en/)

User avatar
patbona63
Posts: 40
Location: Geneva, Switzerland

Re: Finnish religion

Postby patbona63 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:46 pm

The Kalevala is indeed interesting to read and Beowulf too. The name, Beowulf could be understood in seemingly several ways :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf_(hero)

But my heart prefers the following translation : Thor Wolf. I feel it makes more sense.


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