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Practical martial arts

DarkAries

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May 16, 2019
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Which one would be the most practical? I recently practiced ninjutsu and wing chung, here are my pros and cons for them.

Ninjutsu
+ Quick reflexes
+ Makes you more reactive, keep you moving while fighting
+ Versitale tools, you can fight effectively even wih ropes and sticks
+ Hand-to-hand combat focused on making your enemy unable to fight, rather than instantly killing it
- A lot of techniques are situational
- There are no hard hitting moves, its uneffective agains an experienced martial artist.

Wing chung
+ Rather an inmovable object, if your stance is good
+ Very effective in 1v1
+ Use a lot of small hits with full power
- A lot harder to master, need more phisical strength and endurance
- Harder to escape from grabs
- Lot of aspects are more traditional than effective
 
BJJ and Muay Thai. If you're actually trying to learn how to fight.
Isnt BJJ only useful when you are on the ground? I heard a lot of critics because it become more of a sport than an actual martial art.
 
Those two are probably the most useless martial arts that you could ever train.
I know, I realised that soon enough, thats why I search for a better one
 
Isnt BJJ only useful when you are on the ground? I heard a lot of critics because it become more of a sport than an actual martial art.
BJJ is mainly done on the ground, but you will also learn some basic wrestling, meaning how to defend takedowns and how to take someone down. With Muay Thai you will learn striking, but if someone who knows BJJ takes you down and you have no grappling skills, you're done. BJJ is an extremely legit martial art, there's a reason every MMA fighter in the world trains it.
 
Depends on your body type. If you are bulky I would highly recommend boxing or kick boxing



If you are thin and don't have that much strength in your hands then Tae kwon do will be the best. You see in Tae kwon do, although we practice punches, our hands are used mainly for blocking,the real strength is on the kicks ,which we practice a lot! With consistent practice your kicks improves both in strength and speed. You even get to a point when you don't even think about it,the kick comes as reflex.



To be honest ,I think Tae Kwon do is for almost everyone , although people that are more thin are typically better because since we are usually more flexible and move faster ,I rember training with people of every body type. There was even a guy that had an amputated hand and was doing really good!



Also all these stretching exercises that are part of the training will help with your body flexibility which will be very helpful to your Yoga practice (and your health of course)!
 
For majority of cases, Muay Thai absolutely makes you one of the strongest stand up fighters you can be, especially if you also follow the conditioning training that professionals do train. You become hard as steel (Almost), unbreakable. It is a complete martial art with techniques designed to destroy your opponent unarmed, lots of sparring so you gain practical experience.

Wrestling and ground game to go along with this, and you are able to handle any situation you may find yourself in.

However, if all you are concerned about is self defense, then just don't be a pencil neck, avoid places where risks are high so you don't get in a situation where you get stabbed or shot, and don't seek out conflict where you don't have to.

Martial arts can protect you against a few opponents, but the moment someone hits you in the back of your head with a metal pipe, your training is worthless, even worse if they bring anything sharper than a spoon.

Don't get hung up on martial arts, not looking like a target is just as important to not get targeted, regardless if you can defend yourself or not. Carry a weapon if you are legally able to and are legally allowed to use it in self defense.

As you grow older, even martial arts will not help you much, especially if you get jumped by a large group of monkeys. Being situationally aware and quick to recognize danger, being athletic enough to run faster and longer than your attackers will help you more in majority of cases than being able to beat up your friends because you trained MMA for 5 years.

That said, being prepared in case you need it, is better than not. For that, train a practical martial art that teaches you how to take hits and hit back hard.
Kick Boxing, Muay Thai, MMA, these are useful ones.

As for BJJ, in a 1v1, yes, it is very devastating, however, only if you get on the ground, and the last place you want to be when you get into a fight outside of the ring is on the ground. Don't try to wrestle people to the ground or submit them, because even if you can choke someone out in 10 seconds, their friends can be around the corner with who knows what smacking you in the back of your head way faster than you can take out the person you are fighting.
 
Classical Greco-Roman wrestling, sistema and lethwei are most practical in my opinion for the average person. The highest form of martial art only suitable for people that would dedicate their life to training and especially fitting for SS since we already practice some of the inner techniques is Tai Chi.

Streetfighting brings invaluable experience to people that had the misfortune to be frequently engaged in physical confrontation situations and it cannot be replaced by any martial art. A huge part of these things is psychological so a strong body coupled with a strong mind can be quite effective.

It depends what your goal is. Self defence, becoming an accomplished martial artist or something else entirely.

SWP
 
Classical Greco-Roman wrestling, sistema and lethwei are most practical in my opinion for the average person. The highest form of martial art only suitable for people that would dedicate their life to training and especially fitting for SS since we already practice some of the inner techniques is Tai Chi.

Streetfighting brings invaluable experience to people that had the misfortune to be frequently engaged in physical confrontation situations and it cannot be replaced by any martial art. A huge part of these things is psychological so a strong body coupled with a strong mind can be quite effective.

It depends what your goal is. Self defence, becoming an accomplished martial artist or something else entirely.

SWP

Regarding wrestling vs other forms of standup martial arts, I will say this much:

Pit any Muay Thai fighter with a decade of experience against any professional wrestler with a decade of experience in BJJ, Judo and Grappling, and 9/10 times at minimum the wrestler will be one sidedly destroyed without even touching the stand up fighter.

In MMA almost all the most effective takedown defenses from the Muay Thai system are banned, in general in sport fighting almost all the most effective techniques are banned, because they are very lethal and in earlier times with less rules frequently resulted in broken necks and other severe injuries.

Since these athletes are fighting for sports, not for life or death, such extreme techniques are to the detriment of athletes, therefore sports fighting is not a good measure of how well you can use it to defend yourself.

Another thing to think about is the floor.

Outside, the floor is anything between asphalt or concrete to grass. All are harder than an MMA mat that is designed to dampen blows and prevent injuries from being thrown on the ground.

There is also the cage itself, which you can lean into and can be used as part of an effective defense, or the ropes in a Muay Thai or boxing ring. Which does not translate to being pinned against a hard stone wall in an alley.

Unfortunately not much that you learn as a sports fighter translates to reality.

What does translate is the athleticism you build, the toughness and perseverance, and the skill that surpasses an untrained person so you know at least a little what you are doing rather than not, and are athletic enough to escape a bad situation, be it though overpowering someone or through running out of there.


Tai Chi is not a martial art. I am sorry, but Tai Chi, in none of its forms will teach you how to protect yourself in a situation where your life is threatened.

I have seen many cases where this is taught, and it is always the biggest clown joke. I feel sorry for those who learn something thinking it will make them superhuman, when it in reality doesn't help them at all when they need it to save their life.

Tai Chi is amazing for its other benefits however, but it is not a martial art, same as Yoga is not a martial art either.


Sistema is unique, from what I have seen with my very limited exposure to it, the best thing it teaches you, better than most other systems, is how to remain calm in bad situations, keep collected under pressure and get comfortable being uncomfortable, which can be very valuable.

It does not do a lot of standup fighting though, so if you want to learn how to hold your ground on your two feet, one of the most important skills you can learn when it comes to defending your life, you are better of learning something that teaches you that.
 
Good old-fashioned karate!. Kung Fu and Kung Kampo.
Help with flexibility, mind and hand control, builds up " your energy!
And you use it well. And you learn how to do deadly punches and kicks
 
There are also more spiritual martial arts and more material martial arts.

If you want to defend yourself, but your opponent has a knife, it is more likely that you will loose even if you are a master in every kind of martial art. Because they can also throw that knife or something.

With that, in my opinion a papper/gas spray is more effective in self defense than martial art.

If you want to build strength, have strong punches/kicks, you can experiment and train yourself. Moving chi into our movements can make them powerful.

Anyways, if you want to learn combat and "boxing" choose Muay thai as others said.
 
I took karate for about 5 years. It helped me" in SOOO! many ways, it kept,me alert and ware of what's going on around me" I was very limber" strong! And along with Yoga classes." I was able to keep up, with everyone practicing my Kottas. And I was even performing! In karate tournaments with out to many problems. And Kamp is like wrestling and kick boxing. All in one. I love watching that.
 
Regarding wrestling vs other forms of standup martial arts, I will say this much:

Pit any Muay Thai fighter with a decade of experience against any professional wrestler with a decade of experience in BJJ, Judo and Grappling, and 9/10 times at minimum the wrestler will be one sidedly destroyed without even touching the stand up fighter.

In MMA almost all the most effective takedown defenses from the Muay Thai system are banned, in general in sport fighting almost all the most effective techniques are banned, because they are very lethal and in earlier times with less rules frequently resulted in broken necks and other severe injuries.

Since these athletes are fighting for sports, not for life or death, such extreme techniques are to the detriment of athletes, therefore sports fighting is not a good measure of how well you can use it to defend yourself.

Another thing to think about is the floor.

Outside, the floor is anything between asphalt or concrete to grass. All are harder than an MMA mat that is designed to dampen blows and prevent injuries from being thrown on the ground.

There is also the cage itself, which you can lean into and can be used as part of an effective defense, or the ropes in a Muay Thai or boxing ring. Which does not translate to being pinned against a hard stone wall in an alley.

Unfortunately not much that you learn as a sports fighter translates to reality.

What does translate is the athleticism you build, the toughness and perseverance, and the skill that surpasses an untrained person so you know at least a little what you are doing rather than not, and are athletic enough to escape a bad situation, be it though overpowering someone or through running out of there.

This all makes perfect sense and since I don't have any formal experience in wrestling I'll take your word for it. What I meant was that it's good to have a wrestling element developed though not rely on it exclusively.

Tai Chi is not a martial art. I am sorry, but Tai Chi, in none of its forms will teach you how to protect yourself in a situation where your life is threatened.

Here I will respectfully disagree. It does have a variant that is a genuine martial art and superior to most if not all of the others. It is mostly lost to history and there are very few living practitioners but rest assured it still exists.

I have seen many cases where this is taught, and it is always the biggest clown joke. I feel sorry for those who learn something thinking it will make them superhuman, when it in reality doesn't help them at all when they need it to save their life.

It does not make you superhuman by itself and certainly not in just a few years. What makes one superhuman is our way, Satan's knowledge (but you know that better than me) and combined with any martial art it is much more effective than the regular modern training methods. The clown joke is on those that are overly self-confident based on something they have not mastered and do not understand.

Tai Chi is amazing for its other benefits however, but it is not a martial art, same as Yoga is not a martial art either.

From personal experience I can say that it has helped me more than karate or kung fu that I've trained for more than 20 years in real close combat situations way worse than any streetfighting scenario. I'm convinced that it is that particular set of skills that saved my life on multiple occasions.

Sistema is unique, from what I have seen with my very limited exposure to it, the best thing it teaches you, better than most other systems, is how to remain calm in bad situations, keep collected under pressure and get comfortable being uncomfortable, which can be very valuable.

It does not do a lot of standup fighting though, so if you want to learn how to hold your ground on your two feet, one of the most important skills you can learn when it comes to defending your life, you are better of learning something that teaches you that.

You did not say anything about lethwei. What is your opinion on this? No gloves and 9 instead of 8 limbs, I think it's even better than muay thai or the original muay boran.

SWP
 
I agree with JG Voice of Enki. The ability to perceive danger is very important. There is a saying in Japan. "A wise man never courts danger." Nevertheless, physical strength such as martial arts, combat sports, jogging, etc. will give you confidence and train your mind. To add, a kick is three times more powerful than a punch.
 
You did not say anything about lethwei. What is your opinion on this? No gloves and 9 instead of 8 limbs, I think it's even better than muay thai or the original muay boran.

SWP

Note:

Inside the quoted post there are replies to specific parts of it but it didn't turn out as I thought it would.
 
You did not say anything about lethwei. What is your opinion on this? No gloves and 9 instead of 8 limbs, I think it's even better than muay thai or the original muay boran.

SWP

It looks like Muay Boran is better, more ancient indeed, thank you for mentioning.

Here is a good video of it:
 
Which one would be the most practical? I recently practiced ninjutsu and wing chung, here are my pros and cons for them.

In my opinion the best fighting techniques are those that are as close as possible to real life situations, so you can know exactly how to react to what situation. I wouldn't necessarily say that a specific martial art or fighting technique is the best, but a combination of techniques that are relevant for real life situations is the most useful, and real life conflicts cam be so unpredictable that one specific martial art is unlikely to teach everything that someone needs to master. For example defending against knife attack is not being taught a lot in many martial arts as far as I researched.
 

I have seen too many of these "demonstrations".

This is not going to help you against a person that comes swinging, or seeks to harm you in any way.

You won't push people over so easily either if the opponents are doing their best resisting, rather than opening themselves up to the technique for demonstration.

It won't help you when Abdul and his three friends run you down in the alley behind your house, instead this kind of martial art will give you false confidence that gets you hurt.
 
I have seen too many of these "demonstrations".

This is not going to help you against a person that comes swinging, or seeks to harm you in any way.

You won't push people over so easily either if the opponents are doing their best resisting, rather than opening themselves up to the technique for demonstration.

It won't help you when Abdul and his three friends run you down in the alley behind your house, instead this kind of martial art will give you false confidence that gets you hurt.

I hear you, but (authentic) Chen style is legit.
 
I have seen too many of these "demonstrations".

This is not going to help you against a person that comes swinging, or seeks to harm you in any way.

You won't push people over so easily either if the opponents are doing their best resisting, rather than opening themselves up to the technique for demonstration.

It won't help you when Abdul and his three friends run you down in the alley behind your house, instead this kind of martial art will give you false confidence that gets you hurt.

When I watched Muay Thai videos I see that there isn't much moves for close interactions where one grabs the other. Tai chi could be good when they want to grab you but you put them on the ground instead of them.

Maybe mixing multiple martial arts together is the best option.
 
A good martial arts teaches you moves and techniques to end the fight fast, i.e. moves that target weakpoints of your foe and makes you hit them hard.
I agree with VoE and I believe that Muay Thai is the best martial arts to learn for self-defense.

You should also learn "dirty" moves like eye gauges, fishhook, groin hits, throat strikes, etc.
Of course, "dirty" moves are dangerous so use them only if your life is threatened. If it is, I recommend going for the eyes (you could also pair it with a groin hit) and getting out of there right after. They most certainly won't be chasing after you.

As SS you should try avoiding fights altogether. Our lives are too precious to be thrown away.
 
A good martial arts teaches you moves and techniques to end the fight fast, i.e. moves that target weakpoints of your foe and makes you hit them hard.
I agree with VoE and I believe that Muay Thai is the best martial arts to learn for self-defense.

You should also learn "dirty" moves like eye gauges, fishhook, groin hits, throat strikes, etc.
Of course, "dirty" moves are dangerous so use them only if your life is threatened. If it is, I recommend going for the eyes (you could also pair it with a groin hit) and getting out of there right after. They most certainly won't be chasing after you.

As SS you should try avoiding fights altogether. Our lives are too precious to be thrown away.
Throwing sand or other debris, using props as fighting tools... Environment as levearge is a great thing to note.
 
Throwing sand or other debris, using props as fighting tools... Environment as levearge is a great thing to note.

Quite so!

Making a good assessment of an objects characteristics and a solid understanding of basic physics can make a great difference when using that object as a weapon compared to someone who is lacking in those areas.

Feeling the balance point of an object can help you in manipulating it to your advantage. Some creativity goes a long way too.

Having an idea of how something can be used prior to needing it is also helpful.

A large crow bar is an excellent weapon but if one is not skilled in using it (practice and then some more practice) it can have a reverse effect. If someone comes at me with one I could grab it and inflict serious damage, making the original wielder wish he hadn't brought it.

Weapons need a separate thread. Some other time maybe.

SWP
 
As for BJJ, in a 1v1, yes, it is very devastating, however, only if you get on the ground, and the last place you want to be when you get into a fight outside of the ring is on the ground. Don't try to wrestle people to the ground or submit them, because even if you can choke someone out in 10 seconds, their friends can be around the corner with who knows what smacking you in the back of your head way faster than you can take out the person you are fighting.

Another good use for Jiu-Jitsu could be for women, small people, or very muscularly weak people who can't rely on hitting a single abuser by striking, as BJJ isn't very physically demanding and focuses best on learning how to lock the human body up. Of course one should seek to get physically fit too, and a strong person would also benefit immensely if they can couple that + their strength and other MA's as well.


When I watched Muay Thai videos I see that there isn't much moves for close interactions where one grabs the other. Tai chi could be good when they want to grab you but you put them on the ground instead of them.

Maybe mixing multiple martial arts together is the best option.

Muay Thai is highly advanced in clinching, grabbing, and taking down which is what other striking MA's lack. But still, yes it is best when one knows a grappling fighting style too.
 

Al Jilwah: Chapter IV

"It is my desire that all my followers unite in a bond of unity, lest those who are without prevail against them." - Satan

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