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How to become more organised - a rough guide

Stormblood

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Academy of the Dragon, Dinas Ffaraon
[I have seen some posts by people asking about this over the years, me included. Since I studied this in-depth, I decided to create this guide that may be helpful to anyone who struggles with this.]

This is a top-down approach and, in my opinion, it works the best.

Goal-setting - Part 1
The first thing one needs to do is to create an action plan. In this plan, you write down all your life goals. Think carefully about this.

Once you've written them down, read them multiple times out loud. Do they make sense to you? Are those things you really want? Is there anything else you should add? These are a few of many questions you should ask yourself when checking the list you made. Delete any goal that doesn't really resonate with you.

One of the popular ways is setting SMART goals.
:arrow: S is for Specific: Your goal should be well defined. Don't say you want to be rich; say you want to make a certain amount of money.
:arrow: M is for Measurable: If you can't measure your goal, you can't manage it. Getting fit isn't measurable - running a six-minute mile is.
:arrow: A is for Actionable: You wouldn't drive to a new town without asking for directions. Develop the action steps to achieve your goal.
:arrow: R is for Realistic: If you're living in you're parents' basement, it's hard to become a millionaire. Your goals should challenge and stretch you, but not so much that you give up on them.
:arrow: T is for Time-Based: the phrase, "A goal is a dream with a deadline" comes to mind. Setting a time to complete your goal makes you that much more likely to reach it.

Jim Qwik says that, to get your goals out of your head and into your hands, you need to make sure they fit with your emotions - with your HEART:
:arrow: H is for Healthy: How can you make sure your goals support your greater well-being? Your goals should contribute to your mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health.
:arrow: E is for Enduring: Your goals should inspire and sustain you during the difficult times when you want to quit.
:arrow: A is for Alluring: Your shouldn't always have to push yourself to work on your goals. They should be so exciting, enticing, and engaging that you're pulled toward them.
:arrow: R is for Relevant: Don't set a goal without knowing why you're setting it. Ideally, your goals should relate to a challenge you're having, your life purpose, or your core values.
:arrow: T is for Truth: Don't set a goal just because your neighbour is doing it or your parents expect it of you. Make sure your goal is something you want, something that remains true to you. If your goal isn't true to you, you're far more likely to procrastinate and sabotage yourself.

Goal-setting - Part 2
[Disclaimer: Do not start this section until you've read my article about motivation]
Once you're certain about the list you made, start dividing the goals into categories. An example of categories you can use is the twelve houses in astrology. So, you can group each goal under one house. Ideally, you should have one goal for each of them, as the purpose of Spiritual Satanism is to achieve mastery over your life as a whole. You may not have goals for certain areas of your life if you have already mastered that area. Mastering an area means you've reached the pinnacle in it and there's nothing else you could ever want in it, as far as you know. It's otherwise alright to leave blank areas if you are not aware of where you want to head with it. You will find out as you live your life. So, don't worry about it, don't overthink it and don't guilt-trip yourself. Let things unfold naturally.

At this point you should choose up to 3 areas of your life that you want to prioritise over the next 5 years of your life, or even just over the next year of your life. Again, it doesn't need to be perfect. It just needs to be done. This areas should have more goals. For the sake of not overdoing it, let's say up to 3 goals in this example. Overdoing it is a tendency of fire dominant people, and needs to be brought under control because it leads to failure without exception [and a nervous breakdown].

After you have categorised your goals, it is time to start planning how you will achieve them. This is done by breaking down your goals into smaller steps. Long-, medium- and short-term. Let's consider one year of planning. A long-term goal would encompass from 6 months up to the whole year. If you are doing a 5-year plan, long-term goals can also span all 5 years and it would be useful to break them in yearly goals. Medium-term goals can go from 2 weeks up to 6 months. Short-term goals are goals you can achieve in less time, such a weekly goal or a daily task.

It goes without saying that long-term goals are set first, then broken down into medium-term goals. Medium-term goals are finally broken down into short-term goals.

Examples of long-term goals if you are a student at university:
:arrow: Study - I will achieve a Starred 1st class degree [or whatever the top-tier degree in your country]
:arrow: Fitness - I will run 5km in under 18 minutes
:arrow: Spirituality - I will be able to light 5 candles at once

Examples of medium-term goals based on the previous goals:
:arrow: Study - I will achieve 90% of higher in my Physics midterm assignment.
:arrow: Fitness - I will complete my first 5km run the week before Yule.
:arrow: Spirituality - I will be able to light 1 candle 8 weeks from now.

Example of short-term goals based on the above:
:arrow: Study - I will read chapter 1 of my physics text book at 5pm today.
:arrow: Fitness - I will start the Couch to 5K programme at 7am tomorrow with the first session.
:arrow: Spirituality - I will try to turn off a candle for 5-10 minutes at 7pm today.

Daily schedule
Daily tasks are short-term goals you put in your weekly schedule. Your weekly schedule should be made to create a supporting lifestyle that empowers you to achieve your goals. You can prepare this every Sunday or whatever is your most free day during the week. Ideally, they should run Sunday to Saturday, or Monday to Sunday, depending what the first day of the week is in your culture.

Start by considering how many hours you have in a week. A week is made by 168 hours. Cut out sleep hours. On average, you should aim to sleep no less than 5 hours and no more than 9 hours, unless you are ill. Through trial and testing, some of us already know the best sleep schedule for them, and fewer still have the ability to implement it in their lives.

For the purpose of this example, let's consider 8 hours of sleep every night, which is 56 hours in a week. If you subtract them from 168, you get 112 hours. Those are the hours you need to plan. If you take out work and other fixed commitments, such as lectures, seminars and tutorials/supervisions for students, you get left with your spare time. Fit your goals in those hours.

I won't provide any direct example for this, as there are two many variations. I will go more indirectly. A star student I know, has 10 hours a week between seminars and lectures. To this, he adds 30 hours between study, revision and assignment prep. This way he is always ahead of the syllabus (and also studying extra things). This leaves him with 56 hours to plan.

In this 72 hours, 8-10 are blocked for sports (he participates in 2 sports), 3 are blocked for running, and 7 for fitness. 19 hours for spiritual activities (including warfare). The remaining 33-35 are usually for commuting, meals and some more passive leisure. Some weeks he works 8-16 hours, taking them from passive leisure, which doesn't affect him as the rest of his schedule already allows his to relax and have fun. Plus, he loves what he studies, so he's never stressed.

When planning daily tasks for the week, you may need to guess how long it takes for you complete those task. When guessing, it is better to go in excess rather than being too strict with time. And you can adjust as you go.

Daily tasks are the smallest, simplest steps you can take toward your goals. As we know from Jim Qwik in his book Limitless, small simple steps are part of the motivation mechanism.

Accountability
One way to keep yourself accountable is to perform periodic performance reviews. This will increase self-awareness. A daily performance review is the same thing HP Hooded Cobra explained in the first awareness meditation he shared. You do it at night before going to bed. Just follow his instructions and you will be alright.

Take a moderately longer time at the end of the week to do a longer review. You should revisit the whole in a similar way to how you do daily reviews. This should ideally be done before crafting next week's schedule, so you can tweak it to your needs. The process is the same for every next review.

Each month you should a longer monthly review. This will help you when set the next medium-term goals.

Students would benefit from doing an extra review at the end of each school term. Workers can do quarterly reviews instead.

Finally, obviously, you should do an in-depth review at the end of each year, and at the end of a 5-year plan if you made one.

Reviewing your performance not only keeps you accountable but also increases awareness of what you're doing with yourself, with your life. I will not spend any words on this, as I don't think I can live up to HP Hooded Cobra's sermon on awareness. The only thing I need to remind you of is that the attitude that you should keep is the non-judgemental one that is explained in the meditation.

Tools
Here is a list of tools that can keep you organised and focused:
:arrow: Trello- You can find a good guide on how to use this on Liam Porrit's channel on YouTube. He is stellar student who graduated from the University of Cambridge with Starred First degree, did his GDL, and now has a training contract in a Magic Circle firm (these are the top corporate firms in Britain, which are very difficult to get hired from). He is great at organising his life.
:arrow: Focus Keeper- this is a mobile app that uses the pomodoro technique to help you.

Final Words
This is it for this guide. I hope it will be useful to as many people as possible. I will come to review it from time to time, as new knowledge arises. I now challenge you to start making your own action plan and test everything for yourself.

Feel free to add your tools, and also contribute to the guide with your experience. Also, if any section is unclear or would be worth expanding, do not be afraid to point it out.

Onwards and upwards!
 
I like to use"to do lists" like:

1. Create a to do list
2. Write all your open task on it, including the time when they should be done, including tools, people etc... you need.
3. Prioritise which of it is the most important one
4. Furfill them in the right order, most important to not much important.
 
I want to thank you again for this method, I've been working on it developing my plan for the future that should be set in motion sometime soon.

I just want to add, for those of us who like to use open source apps instead:
Notally - A minimalistic note taking app.
https://f-droid.org/packages/com.omgodse.notally/

OpenTasks - A task manager app, allowing you to categorise your todo list by urgency, state, timeframe etc.
https://f-droid.org/en/packages/org.dmfs.tasks/
 
BlackOnyx8 said:
I want to thank you again for this method, I've been working on it developing my plan for the future that should be set in motion sometime soon.

I just want to add, for those of us who like to use open source apps instead:
Notally - A minimalistic note taking app.
https://f-droid.org/packages/com.omgodse.notally/

OpenTasks - A task manager app, allowing you to categorise your todo list by urgency, state, timeframe etc.
https://f-droid.org/en/packages/org.dmfs.tasks/

You could also use Vikunja which, like Trello, is better at task management than note-taking apps, but the UX is very polished and may take a while for some people to learn. Nevertheless, it's private and encrypted. It also offers importing from Trello among other apps.

When it comes to task management, it all depends on personal preference, in the end. Some people will do just fine having a vision board in their room and no digital options to rely on. For convenience, I suggest using both a physical and a digital options. A physical one is better from when you are at home, while digital one helps you when you are on the go.

Thanks for contributing. Thanks to @Fuchs as well. Anyone who wants to add anything or give feedback is very welcome to do so.
 
Stormblood said:
[I have seen some posts by people asking about this over the years, me included. Since I studied this in-depth, I decided to create this guide that may be helpful to anyone who struggles with this.]

This is a top-down approach and, in my opinion, it works the best.

Goal-setting - Part 1
The first thing one needs to do is to create an action plan. In this plan, you write down all your life goals. Think carefully about this.

Once you've written them down, read them multiple times out loud. Do they make sense to you? Are those things you really want? Is there anything else you should add? These are a few of many questions you should ask yourself when checking the list you made. Delete any goal that doesn't really resonate with you.

One of the popular ways is setting SMART goals.
:arrow: S is for Specific: Your goal should be well defined. Don't say you want to be rich; say you want to make a certain amount of money.
:arrow: M is for Measurable: If you can't measure your goal, you can't manage it. Getting fit isn't measurable - running a six-minute mile is.
:arrow: A is for Actionable: You wouldn't drive to a new town without asking for directions. Develop the action steps to achieve your goal.
:arrow: R is for Realistic: If you're living in you're parents' basement, it's hard to become a millionaire. Your goals should challenge and stretch you, but not so much that you give up on them.
:arrow: T is for Time-Based: the phrase, "A goal is a dream with a deadline" comes to mind. Setting a time to complete your goal makes you that much more likely to reach it.

Jim Qwik says that, to get your goals out of your head and into your hands, you need to make sure they fit with your emotions - with your HEART:
:arrow: H is for Healthy: How can you make sure your goals support your greater well-being? Your goals should contribute to your mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health.
:arrow: E is for Enduring: Your goals should inspire and sustain you during the difficult times when you want to quit.
:arrow: A is for Alluring: Your shouldn't always have to push yourself to work on your goals. They should be so exciting, enticing, and engaging that you're pulled toward them.
:arrow: R is for Relevant: Don't set a goal without knowing why you're setting it. Ideally, your goals should relate to a challenge you're having, your life purpose, or your core values.
:arrow: T is for Truth: Don't set a goal just because your neighbour is doing it or your parents expect it of you. Make sure your goal is something you want, something that remains true to you. If your goal isn't true to you, you're far more likely to procrastinate and sabotage yourself.

Goal-setting - Part 2
[Disclaimer: Do not start this section until you've read my article about motivation]
Once you're certain about the list you made, start dividing the goals into categories. An example of categories you can use is the twelve houses in astrology. So, you can group each goal under one house. Ideally, you should have one goal for each of them, as the purpose of Spiritual Satanism is to achieve mastery over your life as a whole. You may not have goals for certain areas of your life if you have already mastered that area. Mastering an area means you've reached the pinnacle in it and there's nothing else you could ever want in it, as far as you know. It's otherwise alright to leave blank areas if you are not aware of where you want to head with it. You will find out as you live your life. So, don't worry about it, don't overthink it and don't guilt-trip yourself. Let things unfold naturally.

At this point you should choose up to 3 areas of your life that you want to prioritise over the next 5 years of your life, or even just over the next year of your life. Again, it doesn't need to be perfect. It just needs to be done. This areas should have more goals. For the sake of not overdoing it, let's say up to 3 goals in this example. Overdoing it is a tendency of fire dominant people, and needs to be brought under control because it leads to failure without exception [and a nervous breakdown].

After you have categorised your goals, it is time to start planning how you will achieve them. This is done by breaking down your goals into smaller steps. Long-, medium- and short-term. Let's consider one year of planning. A long-term goal would encompass from 6 months up to the whole year. If you are doing a 5-year plan, long-term goals can also span all 5 years and it would be useful to break them in yearly goals. Medium-term goals can go from 2 weeks up to 6 months. Short-term goals are goals you can achieve in less time, such a weekly goal or a daily task.

It goes without saying that long-term goals are set first, then broken down into medium-term goals. Medium-term goals are finally broken down into short-term goals.

Examples of long-term goals if you are a student at university:
:arrow: Study - I will achieve a Starred 1st class degree [or whatever the top-tier degree in your country]
:arrow: Fitness - I will run 5km in under 18 minutes
:arrow: Spirituality - I will be able to light 5 candles at once

Examples of medium-term goals based on the previous goals:
:arrow: Study - I will achieve 90% of higher in my Physics midterm assignment.
:arrow: Fitness - I will complete my first 5km run the week before Yule.
:arrow: Spirituality - I will be able to light 1 candle 8 weeks from now.

Example of short-term goals based on the above:
:arrow: Study - I will read chapter 1 of my physics text book at 5pm today.
:arrow: Fitness - I will start the Couch to 5K programme at 7am tomorrow with the first session.
:arrow: Spirituality - I will try to turn off a candle for 5-10 minutes at 7pm today.

Daily schedule
Daily tasks are short-term goals you put in your weekly schedule. Your weekly schedule should be made to create a supporting lifestyle that empowers you to achieve your goals. You can prepare this every Sunday or whatever is your most free day during the week. Ideally, they should run Sunday to Saturday, or Monday to Sunday, depending what the first day of the week is in your culture.

Start by considering how many hours you have in a week. A week is made by 168 hours. Cut out sleep hours. On average, you should aim to sleep no less than 5 hours and no more than 9 hours, unless you are ill. Through trial and testing, some of us already know the best sleep schedule for them, and fewer still have the ability to implement it in their lives.

For the purpose of this example, let's consider 8 hours of sleep every night, which is 56 hours in a week. If you subtract them from 168, you get 112 hours. Those are the hours you need to plan. If you take out work and other fixed commitments, such as lectures, seminars and tutorials/supervisions for students, you get left with your spare time. Fit your goals in those hours.

I won't provide any direct example for this, as there are two many variations. I will go more indirectly. A star student I know, has 10 hours a week between seminars and lectures. To this, he adds 30 hours between study, revision and assignment prep. This way he is always ahead of the syllabus (and also studying extra things). This leaves him with 56 hours to plan.

In this 72 hours, 8-10 are blocked for sports (he participates in 2 sports), 3 are blocked for running, and 7 for fitness. 19 hours for spiritual activities (including warfare). The remaining 33-35 are usually for commuting, meals and some more passive leisure. Some weeks he works 8-16 hours, taking them from passive leisure, which doesn't affect him as the rest of his schedule already allows his to relax and have fun. Plus, he loves what he studies, so he's never stressed.

When planning daily tasks for the week, you may need to guess how long it takes for you complete those task. When guessing, it is better to go in excess rather than being too strict with time. And you can adjust as you go.

Daily tasks are the smallest, simplest steps you can take toward your goals. As we know from Jim Qwik in his book Limitless, small simple steps are part of the motivation mechanism.

Accountability
One way to keep yourself accountable is to perform periodic performance reviews. This will increase self-awareness. A daily performance review is the same thing HP Hooded Cobra explained in the first awareness meditation he shared. You do it at night before going to bed. Just follow his instructions and you will be alright.

Take a moderately longer time at the end of the week to do a longer review. You should revisit the whole in a similar way to how you do daily reviews. This should ideally be done before crafting next week's schedule, so you can tweak it to your needs. The process is the same for every next review.

Each month you should a longer monthly review. This will help you when set the next medium-term goals.

Students would benefit from doing an extra review at the end of each school term. Workers can do quarterly reviews instead.

Finally, obviously, you should do an in-depth review at the end of each year, and at the end of a 5-year plan if you made one.

Reviewing your performance not only keeps you accountable but also increases awareness of what you're doing with yourself, with your life. I will not spend any words on this, as I don't think I can live up to HP Hooded Cobra's sermon on awareness. The only thing I need to remind you of is that the attitude that you should keep is the non-judgemental one that is explained in the meditation.

Tools
Here is a list of tools that can keep you organised and focused:
:arrow: Trello- You can find a good guide on how to use this on Liam Porrit's channel on YouTube. He is stellar student who graduated from the University of Cambridge with Starred First degree, did his GDL, and now has a training contract in a Magic Circle firm (these are the top corporate firms in Britain, which are very difficult to get hired from). He is great at organising his life.
:arrow: Focus Keeper- this is a mobile app that uses the pomodoro technique to help you.

Final Words
This is it for this guide. I hope it will be useful to as many people as possible. I will come to review it from time to time, as new knowledge arises. I now challenge you to start making your own action plan and test everything for yourself.

Feel free to add your tools, and also contribute to the guide with your experience. Also, if any section is unclear or would be worth expanding, do not be afraid to point it out.

Onwards and upwards!

I love this! This is so helpful. I am a person who likes to plan every hour almost to my detriment (kind of becomes an obsession). On the other hand, your planning style accounts for how one is feeling and also the reviews and goal setting is something I want to try out. It is helpful to see how spiritual satanists organize their time because life can be so busy at times and this makes sticking to both spiritual and other goals seem more realistic.
 
Cynthia said:
I love this! This is so helpful. I am a person who likes to plan every hour almost to my detriment (kind of becomes an obsession).

This can definitely hold you back in some ways. I can relate with what I have experienced in the past, as well. When I did energy work to help resolve this, the resulting negative karma made me have days that felt like I saw problems everywhere and couldn't relax. Beyond this, other work had been done that changed how I viewed the purpose of my work as whole.

After removing the negative karma associated with these two points of stress, it felt much easier to adapt to sudden circumstances without feeling a twinge of stress or loss of control.

It is always good to take notes of how Saturn likes to operate, as Saturn creates long-term success through organization. When we look at Saturn in the 10th or 11th houses, we can see that it likes to control many things at once, not just obsess on one "system" or mechanism. Saturn's home sign of Capricorn shows that it will do whatever it takes to survive, such as the survival of a business.

Unlike Taurus, Capricorn does not want to repeat negative processes over and over. Where Taurus may be slow to act, Capricorn has not problems adapting for the sake of success. This is why it can be ruthless, compared to the Venusian Taurus.

Relative to what you describe, this energy would help you focus on your larger career goals, as opposed to the outcome of a single hour or day.
 
Great post, Stormblood :) (I'm sorry I didn't see this when you originally posted it.)

Organization of daily tasks is imperative to success. I've had solar returns with Pluto in the 6th, which completely revamped my daily routine. Something I've learned from experience is that switching up when I do yoga or a routine household chore (like when to do laundry, for example) can completely alter the entire day.

We SS have extra daily tasks such as meditation, RTRs, helping in the forums, and so on; this takes more time of our days. So we need to learn to manage our time better. All posts such as this are very helpful.
 
Lydia [JG said:
" post_id=426148 time=1676971390 user_id=57]
Great post, Stormblood :) (I'm sorry I didn't see this when you originally posted it.)

Organization of daily tasks is imperative to success. I've had solar returns with Pluto in the 6th, which completely revamped my daily routine. Something I've learned from experience is that switching up when I do yoga or a routine household chore (like when to do laundry, for example) can completely alter the entire day.

We SS have extra daily tasks such as meditation, RTRs, helping in the forums, and so on; this takes more time of our days. So we need to learn to manage our time better. All posts such as this are very helpful.

Thank you and don't worry about it
 

I want to express my gratitude for this excellent post. It has been a while since I read it and I have been adhering to it every day since. I was struggling back then and this has been of enormous use to me and as it changed my perspective on how to set goals and work towards them.
 
Stormblood said:
Feel free to add your tools, and also contribute to the guide with your experience. Also, if any section is unclear or would be worth expanding, do not be afraid to point it out.
Onwards and upwards!

Todoist - if you design a system that works for you with appropriate projects, labels, filters, calendar integration etc. It can be super helpful.
 
Blitzkreig [JG said:
" post_id=426103 time=1676949962 user_id=21286]
Cynthia said:
I love this! This is so helpful. I am a person who likes to plan every hour almost to my detriment (kind of becomes an obsession).

This can definitely hold you back in some ways. I can relate with what I have experienced in the past, as well. When I did energy work to help resolve this, the resulting negative karma made me have days that felt like I saw problems everywhere and couldn't relax. Beyond this, other work had been done that changed how I viewed the purpose of my work as whole.

After removing the negative karma associated with these two points of stress, it felt much easier to adapt to sudden circumstances without feeling a twinge of stress or loss of control.

It is always good to take notes of how Saturn likes to operate, as Saturn creates long-term success through organization. When we look at Saturn in the 10th or 11th houses, we can see that it likes to control many things at once, not just obsess on one "system" or mechanism. Saturn's home sign of Capricorn shows that it will do whatever it takes to survive, such as the survival of a business.

Unlike Taurus, Capricorn does not want to repeat negative processes over and over. Where Taurus may be slow to act, Capricorn has not problems adapting for the sake of success. This is why it can be ruthless, compared to the Venusian Taurus.

Relative to what you describe, this energy would help you focus on your larger career goals, as opposed to the outcome of a single hour or day.

Thank you for your response. I am trying to remove unwanted connections and clean away past karma and I think it is slowly helping. Do you mean to focus on the energy of Saturn? Or that I should study this aspect of my birth chart to see what is going on? Sorry I'm a bit confused.
Thank you for your help!
 
Cynthia said:
Thank you for your response. I am trying to remove unwanted connections and clean away past karma and I think it is slowly helping. Do you mean to focus on the energy of Saturn? Or that I should study this aspect of my birth chart to see what is going on? Sorry I'm a bit confused.
Thank you for your help!

Any earth placement, including Saturn or planets with the sign of Capricorn, can have aspects of being stuck, moving too slow, excess stubbornness, etc. So yes, you should look at your chart and try to determine specifically what may be causing this.

Some of what I wrote was also just general information, so that does not mean I am saying you should focus on solving this immediately. I think what you are doing is already a good plan of action.
 
Blitzkreig [JG said:
" post_id=427458 time=1677540063 user_id=21286]
Cynthia said:
Thank you for your response. I am trying to remove unwanted connections and clean away past karma and I think it is slowly helping. Do you mean to focus on the energy of Saturn? Or that I should study this aspect of my birth chart to see what is going on? Sorry I'm a bit confused.
Thank you for your help!

Any earth placement, including Saturn or planets with the sign of Capricorn, can have aspects of being stuck, moving too slow, excess stubbornness, etc. So yes, you should look at your chart and try to determine specifically what may be causing this.

Some of what I wrote was also just general information, so that does not mean I am saying you should focus on solving this immediately. I think what you are doing is already a good plan of action.

Thank you for the clarification! I appreciate your help and the time you took to give me advice. I will look into this as far as my birth chart because there are a lot of times I've felt stuck or like I'm moving more slowly than I'd like toward my goals.
 
Bump, starting from tomorrow, Sunday, I am free the whole day and will create long, mid and short term goals. I have a app called HabitNow and Ive been using it to make meditations into a habit which worked. I am planning to use it again in this case, it doesnt have functions such as keeping track or progress but its worth mentioning.
 
Trust me, I tried, I prefer old fashioned way of paper and pen as I might forget how to write in the future lol, but I never really make it into a habit of writing, tried journaling but didnt work either. It is probably I constantly forget that I need to journal.
 
i love being organised a lot. its like my therapy way. i have been using a regular agenda notebook for years. my favourite thing to do every sunday evening is to plan my week. mine has really become an obsession.
i even write down where to start before i tidy the house. i even have a separate box for my batteries in my house. meditations and studies on my computer, all separated by subject. since 2014, i keep all my photos in separate files according to the people and places i took them. life is so easy like this. i do not even spend time to find what im looking for. i love doing this so muchmmmm
 

Al Jilwah: Chapter IV

"It is my desire that all my followers unite in a bond of unity, lest those who are without prevail against them." - Satan

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